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Christ Church, CEP Academy, Brockman Road, Folkestone, Kent

Art

Art and Design

Intent

At our school we intend that children should master art and design to such an extent that they can go on to have careers within art and design and make use of art effectively in their everyday lives.

Our children will be taught art and design in a way that ensures progression of skills and follows a sequence to build on previous learning.

Our children will gain experience and skills of a wide range of formal elements of art in a way that will enhance their learning opportunities, enabling them to use art and design across a range of subjects to be creative and solve problems, ensuring they make progress.

 

Implementation

We follow a broad and balanced art and design curriculum that builds on previous learning and provides both support and challenge for learners. We follow an art and design scheme that ensures a progression of skills and covers all aspects of the art and design curriculum in line with the NSEAD recommended planning and assessment framework.

This planning and assessment framework uses the four National Curriculum aims to define four distinct progress objectives. These are used to ensure consistency across planning, teaching and assessment. Like the National Curriculum aims, these progress objectives arise from the key ideas that have always been at the heart of teaching and learning in art, craft and design. There is, therefore, continuity with previous good practice in the subject. The four progress objectives are:

  1. Generating ideas: The skills of designing and developing ideas.
  2. Making: The skills of making art, craft, and design.
  3. Evaluating: The skills of judgement and evaluation.
  4. Knowledge: The knowledge of both technical processes and cultural context.

All projects will develop pupils’ skills in the artistic disciplines of drawing, painting, sculpture and printmaking. As pupils progress though the curriculum, these skills are continually revisited and developed throughout their time at Christ Church.

All classes will have a scheduled art and design lesson each week, which we share with design and technology. However, the project will be taught discreetly – in projects independent of each other.

Children’s work and pictures of their work will be stored in each child’s sketchbook that continues throughout each key stage for reference and assessment.

We want to ensure that art and design is embedded in our whole school curriculum and that opportunities for enhancing learning by using art are always taken.

 

Impact

Our children enjoy and value art and design and know why they are doing things, not just how. Children will understand and appreciate the value of art and design in the context of their personal wellbeing and the creative and cultural industries and their many career opportunities.

Progress in art and design is demonstrated through regularly reviewing and scrutinising children’s work, in accordance with our art and design assessment policy to ensure that progression of skills is taking place. Namely through:

Looking at pupils’ work, especially over time as they gain skills and knowledge.

Observing how they perform in lessons and talking to them about what they know.

Staff will be supported in moderating pupils’ work against the assessment framework during a staff INSET planned for the summer term.

The art and design curriculum will contribute to children’s personal development in creativity, independence, judgement and self-reflection. This would be seen in them being able to talk confidently about their work and sharing their work with others.

Progress will be shown through outcomes and through the important record of the process leading to them.

 

Planning for Learning, Assessment and Progression

Assessment:

Assessment in art, craft and design takes account of all aspects of pupils’ learning and achievement. This includes, not only what pupils make, but also how they make it, what skills they acquire and what they know about the tools and materials they use. Assessment also takes account of what they know about the world of art, craft and design which places their own work in the wider cultural context.

Teachers assess progress in art, craft and design through a variety of means and use different kinds of evidence. They consider both the quality of the products that pupils make and the skills they exhibit as they use tools, materials and processes. To assess their knowledge teachers listen to pupils talking about art, craft and design and read what they write. The evidence for assessment occurs in different forms and at different times through the course of a unit of work and so assessment too is spread out over time. These assessments are used over time to build a profile of achievement across all four of the progress objectives.

 

Progress Objectives:

The four progress objectives used in this framework are derived from the four aims of the National Curriculum. The four headings of ‘Generating Ideas’, ‘Making’, ‘Evaluating’, and ‘Knowledge’ define the conceptual framework which underpins all teaching and learning in the subject. The use of these headings throughout this framework ensures consistency of planning, teaching and assessment.

We, at Christ Church, include an assessment criteria table as suggested by the NSEAD and this provides criteria in each progress objective for each of Years 1 – 6. This provides a benchmark establishing reasonable expectations of achievement across all progress objectives for each year group.

Pupils’ work will be moderated and assessed against the criteria as exceeding expectations, meeting expectations and working towards expectations.

 

Exceeding: Pupils who are exceeding the expectations will typically be providing evidence of achievement which consistently extends their learning beyond the confines of the task. They are working in ways which show deeper understanding and mastery, and which are above the norm for their peer group. Assessment in each of the strands could be described as:

1. Generating Ideas: Showing greater: complexity; research; observation; originality; perception; aspiration; creativity.

2. Making: Showing greater: technique; skill; control; complexity; mastery; quality; judgement; creativity.

3. Evaluating: Showing greater: judgement; autonomy; independence; perception; subtlety.

4. Knowledge: Showing greater: breadth; contextual understanding; explanation; judgement.

Meeting: Pupils who are meeting the expectations in full will typically be providing consistent evidence of achievement which shows that they have understood and confidently achieved the assessment criteria. They are working at a standard which is appropriate for their peer group.

Developing: Pupils who have yet to meet the expectations in full will typically be providing evidence of achievement which is consistently less resolved and confident than their peer group.

Art and Design Subject Overview

Year Group

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

R

'Draw themselves / family, Patterns.

Construct a home for a Bog Baby.

Collage

Junk modelling mini beasts

Clay modelling

Card printing

'Character role play / Cultural dance

'Print design / marbling

'fossil making / printing / 2Simple Paint

Potato Printing

Sand / beach collage /

1

DT

Colour: Mixing paints Form:

Exploring shape, line and colour: mixing and painting with secondary colours, using circles to create abstract compositions and working collaboratively to create a class piece of art inspired by water.

Artists: Beatriz Milhazes

Brigit Riley

Jasper Johns

DT

Landscapes using different media

Experimenting with different art materials to create texture.

Example theme: The seaside.

Artists: William Turner

John Piper

Tacita Dean

Collage (link Science plants and Geography local fieldwork)                      Gustav Klimt (Geometry link)                                 Plus Science/seasons link: photos/printing (trees throughout the year); leaf printing; bark rubbing                                    plus Binka tapestry ; make a woodland crown                                     Andy Goldsworthy for natural sculptures

Artists: Andy Goldworthy

Gustav Klimt

Karl Blossfeldt

DT

2

DT

DT

Formal elements of art

Pattern, texture, and tone: creating printed patterns using everyday objects, taking rubbings using different media and creating 3D drawings.

Artists: Max Ernst

Human Form

Exploring how bodies and faces are portrayed in art: looking at works of art, creating collages, drawing portrait, creating a peg figure and collage.

Artists: Damien Hurst

Julien Opie

Edwina Bridgeman

DT

Art and Design skills

Design, drawing, craft, painting and art appreciation: replicating the recognisable crockery of Clarice Cliff, exploring tone through shading, developing weaving skills, working with clay and experimenting with brush strokes.

(These are stand-alone lessons so can be fitted around the play and testing)

Artists: Clarice Cliff

Nancy McCroskey

3

Observational drawings of whole/cut fruit and vegetables/ Arcimboldo.

Poly-block printing using 2 colours and the printing press.

Artists: Arcimboldo

DT

DT

Drawing and painting                       Cave drawings (natural materials for mark-making, foraged berries for paint)                                 Alberto Giacometti   

Prehistoric art

Learning about how and why art was created thousands of years ago, making homemade paints from natural materials and replicating painting techniques from the past

                                 

DT

Collage                            Roman mosaics

Use collage in the design process to create a mosaic in the style of the Romans. Consider how mosaics are used by contemporary artists  such as Matt Small.

                                                                                              

4

DT

DT

Painting

Looking at how artists have used water as a feature of their work. Making a study of David Hockney’s “A bigger Splash”.

DT

Formal elements of Art

Exploring texture and pattern – developing a range of mark-making techniques, making and printing with textured stamps for printing, drawing ‘flip’ patterns and recreating a famous geometric pattern.

Portraits. Observational drawing of the features of the face, focusing on the eye. Shading techniques. Moving to abstraction with a cubist portrait of a head made as a cardboard relief.

Artists: Picasso

Braque

Claudette Johnson

5

DT

 Sculpture                  Greek pots (papier Mache). Looking at decoration of Greek pots and the influence on modern ceramicists today.

Looking at silhouettes and drawing with a shadow in the style of 18th century miniatures.

Artists: Magdalene Odundo.

Bruegel

Keith Haring

                  

DT

William Morris             repeated patterns, making ceramic tiles. The arts and craft movement.  

Collagraph print using card and the printing press using inspired by William Morris and De Morgan 

 Artists: William Morris

William De Morgan

Yinka Shonibare                                        

DT

Every picture tells a story.

Exploring the meaning behind art – analyse the work of Banksy; making symmetry prints inspired by Rorschach, telling a story using emojis, and taking inspiration from ceramic artist Odundo.

Artists: Magdalene Odundo

Banksey

Andy Warhol

John Singer Sargent

6

Painting                                     War scenes. Artists study Paul Nash 'We are making a New World' colour mixing and working with tempera paints. 

Artists: Paul Nash

John Singer Sargent

DT

fossils

Inspired by Paolozzi, casting in plaster to make relief panels with collected objects e.g. plastic objects.

Artists: Paolozzi

El Anatsui

Jim Dine

DT

Reflections in art drawing and watercolour skills. observation

Taking a part of a reflection image, create a screen print with repeated pattern.

Artists: Carravaggio Monet

Yayou Kasuma

DT

Skills Progression Overview

Year

Drawing

Painting

Sculpture

Printing

R

Term 1:

Draw themselves.

Patterns.

Term 3:

Marbling

Term 5:

Painting on the computer.

Term 1: construct a home for a Bog baby

Term 2:

Junk modelling

Clay modelling

Term 2:

Card printing (foam prints)

Term 5:

Potato prints.

1

Term 2:

Exploring line.

Drawing using cut out shapes.

Term 4:

Using drawing to plan a landscape.

Term 2:

Colour mixing – primary secondary colours.

Term 4:

Using texture in paining and collage.

Term 5:

Making a crown from natural materials.

Term 5:

Leaf printing using printing press introduction; bark rubbing

2

Term 3:

Exploring pattern texture and tone.

Term 4:

Drawing a portrait

Term 6:

Painting a design for a plate; exploring colour.

Experimenting with brush strokes.

Term 3:

Using wire to create 3D drawings.

Term 4:

Creating a peg figure

Term 6

Developing weaving skills. Working with clay.

Term 3:

Creating printed patterns using everyday objects.

3

Term 1:

Drawing from observation using line and tone to create depth.

Using drawings to create a design for a print.

Term 4:

Making homemade paints from natural materials.

Using ‘cave art’ painting techniques to create an artwork.

Term 6:

Making mosaics. Creating tiles for mosaics from clay.

Term 1:

Poly-block printing in 2 colours and using printing press.

4

Term 4:

Developing a range of different make making and using this to explore pattern and texture.

Term 6:

Observational drawing of the features of the face; shading techniques.

Term 3:

Exploring how artist have used paint to depict water.

Term 6:

Relief cardboard portrait in the style of the cubists.

Term 4:

Printing with textured stamps.

Creating ‘flip’ drawings.

5

Term 2:

Drawing a silhouette using a shadow.

Term 6:

Using drawing to illustrate a story.

Term 2:

Painting on  a 3D object in the a Greek styles – painting as decoration.

Term 2:

Paper Mache Greek pots.

Term 4:

Tile making and glazed pattern in the style of William Morris.

Term 4:

William Morris repeated pattern prints.

Term 6:

Making symmetry prints

6

Term 1:

Drawing a landscape to develop into a painting – drawing as planning.

Term 3:

Drawing ideas for relief panels.

Term 5:

Drawing water.

Term 1:

Using colour in a landscape painting to show aerial perspective.

Using paint to create emotion in an image. Developing sophisticated and subtle colour mixing in a landscape.

Term 5:

Watercolour seascape.

Term 3:

Creating relief panels by casting clay and found objects.

Term 3

Carbon paper fossil mono-prints.

Term 6:

Screen printing inspired by water/sea

 

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